To bring you the best content on our sites and applications, Meredith partners with third party advertisers to serve digital ads, including personalized digital ads. Those advertisers use tracking technologies to collect information about bitcoin twitter search tool activity on our sites and applications and across the Internet and your other apps and devices. Receive all Bitcoinist news in Telegram! The forecast comes as Bitcoin’s hold on the market fell dramatically this week after Bitcoin Cash controversially surged in value and altcoins saw massive price gains.

2018 is going to be a huge fork explosion. The sudden popularity of Bitcoin hard forks in December has seen variations of an increasingly unlikely nature, including so-called Super Bitcoin, Bitcoin Uranium and even Bitcoin God, due for release December 25. The phenomenon, which coincided with the previously fervent ICO market cooling somewhat, looks set to increase in the near future, due in part to the relative ease with which anyone can now fork the Bitcoin network. Covert criticism of BCash is not in short supply, with a wry explanation of the impetus to create the forking tool gracing the homepage. What Bitcoin hard fork would you like to issue?

Let us know in the comments below! Patient data, when used in the right way can decrease healthcare costs by reducing waste, improve patient quality of life, and ultimately save lives. Medicine adherence data in combination with patient data can go a step further to improve patient experience and satisfaction, increase medicine safety and usability. Days after the Federal Reserve’s major announcement that it would hike short-term interest rates four times instead of three in 2018, bank stocks have failed to improve as expected. Jim Cramer shared his take on the matter, outlining the rising popularity of Bitcoin and other blockchain-based technologies as one of the possible reasons. You’re a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. Additional information is available in this support article.

After completing the CAPTCHA below, you will immediately regain access to www. Beyond the Bitcoin Bubble Yes, it’s driven by greed — but the mania for cryptocurrency could wind up building something much more important than wealth. In the lingo of cryptography, they’re known as my seed phrase. They might read like an incoherent stream of consciousness, but these words can be transformed into a key that unlocks a digital bank account, or even an online identity. It just takes a few more steps. On the screen, I’m instructed to keep my seed phrase secure: Write it down, or keep it in a secure place on your computer.

That string is my address on the Ethereum blockchain. Ethereum belongs to the same family as the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, whose value has increased more than 1,000 percent in just the past year. Ethereum has its own currencies, most notably Ether, but the platform has a wider scope than just money. You can think of my Ethereum address as having elements of a bank account, an email address and a Social Security number. The whole exchange takes no more than a few minutes to complete. From my perspective, the experience barely differs from the usual routines of online life. But on a technical level, something miraculous is happening — something that would have been unimaginable just a decade ago.

I’ve managed to complete a secure transaction without any of the traditional institutions that we rely on to establish trust. And the platform that makes all this possible? There are no venture investors backing Ethereum Inc. As an organizational form, Ethereum is far closer to a democracy than a private corporation. No imperial chief executive calls the shots.

You may be inclined to dismiss these transformations. After all, Bitcoin and Ether’s runaway valuation looks like a case study in irrational exuberance. And why should you care about an arcane technical breakthrough that right now doesn’t feel all that different from signing in to a website to make a credit card payment? But that dismissal would be shortsighted.

If there’s one thing we’ve learned from the recent history of the internet, it’s that seemingly esoteric decisions about software architecture can unleash profound global forces once the technology moves into wider circulation. The true believers behind blockchain platforms like Ethereum argue that a network of distributed trust is one of those advances in software architecture that will prove, in the long run, to have historic significance. That promise has helped fuel the huge jump in cryptocurrency valuations. But in a way, the Bitcoin bubble may ultimately turn out to be a distraction from the true significance of the blockchain. Once the inspiration for utopian dreams of infinite libraries and global connectivity, the internet has seemingly become, over the past year, a universal scapegoat: the cause of almost every social ill that confronts us. Last year marked the point at which that narrative finally collapsed. Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs’s biographer, wrote in an essay published a few weeks after Donald Trump was elected president.

That remedy is not yet visible in any product that would be intelligible to an ordinary tech consumer. The only blockchain project that has crossed over into mainstream recognition so far is Bitcoin, which is in the middle of a speculative bubble that makes the 1990s internet I. To some students of modern technological history, the internet’s fall from grace follows an inevitable historical script. Blockchain advocates don’t accept the inevitability of the Cycle. The roots of the internet were in fact more radically open and decentralized than previous information technologies, they argue, and had we managed to stay true to those roots, it could have remained that way. To understand why, it helps to think of the internet as two fundamentally different kinds of systems stacked on top of each other, like layers in an archaeological dig.

One layer is composed of the software protocols that were developed in the 1970s and 1980s and hit critical mass, at least in terms of audience, in the 1990s. In fact, that original openness continues to be all around us, in ways we probably don’t appreciate enough. To see how enormous but also invisible the benefits of such protocols have been, imagine that one of those key standards had not been developed: for instance, the open standard we use for defining our geographic location, GPS. But what if the military had kept GPS out of the public domain? Presumably, sometime in the 1990s, a market signal would have gone out to the innovators of Silicon Valley and other tech hubs, suggesting that consumers were interested in establishing their exact geographic coordinates so that those locations could be projected onto digital maps.

But none of that happened, for a simple reason. Geolocation, like the location of web pages and email addresses and domain names, is a problem we solved with an open protocol. And because it’s a problem we don’t have, we rarely think about how beautifully GPS does work and how many different applications have been built on its foundation. But since we settled on the World Wide Web in the mid-’90s, we’ve adopted very few new open-standard protocols. The biggest problems that technologists tackled after 1995 — many of which revolved around identity, community and payment mechanisms — were left to the private sector to solve. For all their brilliance, the inventors of the open protocols that shaped the internet failed to include some key elements that would later prove critical to the future of online culture. Perhaps most important, they did not create a secure open standard that established human identity on the network.